Kanewari = layout and positioning of utensils and the body according to yin yang theory.

 

Yin & Yang lines (kane) on tatami

Number of Yang lines (kane) on tatami (lengthways) 5 lines (kane)
How many Yin spaces on tatami (lengthways) 6 space (kane)
Distance between Yin & Yang lines (kane) Around 10 wales (tatami weaves)


Standard orientation brazier

本勝手・風炉

  • The front edge of the ‘koita’ (small board) is placed at line 1. Line 1 represents the position 1 shaku (30.3cm) upwards from the mid-point of the tatami mat (mid point of tatami is at line 2)
  • The left edge of the koita (small board) (board is 9sun, 5bu or total 30.195cm) is placed 9 wales from the tatami rim on the ‘katte’ mizuya side of the tatami. The right edge of the koita (small board) does not go to the middle of the tatami, it sits closer to the ‘katte’ (mizuya preparation room) side
  • The mizusashi is place on the middle line dividing points I and A
  • When using a stand, the front edge of the stand and front edge of the koita are aligned straight, and the stand is placed on the middle line dividing points I and A
  • The futaoki (lid rest) is placed 3 wales in from the line U and 3 wales back from the line 1
  • Your right knee comes to line 3. Line 3 is 1 sun (3.3cm) back from the tatami centre line 2. Your seat aligns to the right edge of the koita (small board), thus slightly angled left

The 7 irregularities for positioning the brazier

  1. The koita (small board) is positioned slightly askew towards the seat of the host
  2. The brazier is positioned slightly askew to the ‘katte’ mizuya side of the tatami
  3. The front 2 tripod feet are slightly higher than the back foot
  4. The front tile leans slightly to the inside of the brazier
  5. The front side of the iron kettle sits slightly higher than the back side
  6. The handle of the ‘hishaku’ bamboo ladle sits on an angle towards the seat of the host
  7. The seat of the host is on a slight angle towards the brazier


Standard orientation brazier with display stand (tana)

本勝手・風炉・棚

  • The front edge of the ‘koita’ (small board) is placed flush with line 1. Line 1 represents the position 1 shaku (30.3cm) upwards from the mid-point of the tatami mat (mid point of tatami is at line 2)
  • The left edge of the koita (small board) is placed 5 or 7 wales from the tatami rim on the ‘katte’ mizuya side of the tatami. The right edge of the koita (small board) does not go to the middle of the tatami, it sits closer to the ‘katte’ (mizuya preparation room) side
  • The front edge of the stand and front edge of the koita are aligned straight, and the stand is placed on the middle line dividing points I and A
  • The futaoki (lid rest) is placed 3 wales in from the line U and 3 wales back from the line 1
  • Your right knee comes to line 3. Line 3 is 1 sun (3.3cm) back from the tatami centre line 2. Your seat is straight in line with line I (not angled to the left as above)


Standard orientation hearth

本勝手・炉

  • Mizusashi is placed on the middle of the tatami, and with the back of the mizusashi sitting just over the line ① 
  • Sit on top of the line that joins point A on the inside corner of the rodan (fire box), and point ④. Sit aligned directly to point A
  • The left knee does not goabove line ③. The right knee comes to around 8 sun (26.4cm) from the robuchi (hearth frame)
  • The handle of the hishaku (bamboo ladle) is placed ⅔ of the way down the robuchi (hearth frame), parallel to the line that joins point A on the inside corner of the rodan (fire box), and point ④
  • The kensui should not come to a point much higher than line ② 


Standard orientation hearth with display stand (tana)

本勝手・炉・棚

  • Stand is placed 8 sun (26.4cm) from the U point on the outside corner of the robuchi (hearth frame), the front of the stand flush with the line E
  • Sit on top of the line that joins point U and point ⑤. Sit aligned directly to point U
  • Identical to the single mizusashi setup above, the left knee does not go above line ③. The right knee comes to around 8 sun (26.4cm) from the robuchi (hearth frame)
  • The handle of the hishaku bamboo ladle is placed ¾ of the way down the robuchi (hearth frame), over point I, and parallel to your seat and the line that joins point U and point 5


Reverse-orientation brazier (gyaku-gatte)

逆勝手・ 風炉

  • The koita (small board) is angled across ¼ of a tatami weave, instead of ½ a weave as usual
  • Shimo is to the right side of the temae, opposite of usual
  • The display of the chaire in front of the mizusashi before the start of the  temae is ⅔rds to shimo, ⅓ to kami (orientation centre line of mizusashi)
  • Place the chakin on the left corner of the koita (opinions vary - some sensei's prefer the right corner)
  • Hishaku sits straight on the kama
  • The izumai (formal sitting position for the temae) is angled 1.5cm to shimo (around half of that of the standar orientation)
  • The mizusashi lid and shifuku are handled with the left hand


Reverse-orientation hearth (gyaku-gatte)

逆勝手・ 炉

 

  • Izumai is aligned with the outside corner of the hearth frame (robuchi)
  • Right knee rests 1 sun (3.03cm) below the extended line from the outside edge of the hearth frame (which equates to the lengthways centre of the tatami)
  • Left knee comes to 14 weaves from the tatami rim
  • Futaoki is placed in the same position as when you use a tana for the standard orientation temae - 3 weaves from the rim and 3 weaves from the robuchi on the outside mat
  • The handle of the hishaku comes to 2 weaves (1 sun / 3.03cm) before your seat
  • The kensui rests just over the extended line from the outside edge of the robuchi
  • Tana are not used for reverse-orientation temae
  • There is no reverse orientation for the daisu


Centre-brazier (naka-oki)

中置

  • The brazier is placed in the centre of the dōgu-datami (temae-za / temae mat). The brazier comes to 22 tatami weaves (22me) from the host’s seat (two weaves further away than usual). As the hosts seat is 1 shaku away from the brazier normally, this means for centre-brazier the distance is 1 shaku 1 sun (in traditional measurement)
  • The number of weaves to the right of the brazier to the tatami rim must be odd 
  • The mizusashi is placed in the middle of the left space beside the brazier, at shimo. A third of the width of the mizusashi sits before the front edge of the koita, two-thirds are behind the edge
  • The chaire is centred in the kyaku-tsuki (guest’s side) half of the tatami, one third of the width of the chaire over the right-centre line and two-thirds closer to the centre of the temae. The chai-re is place 2 sun (6cm or 4 weaves) from the extended horizontal line from the front edge of the koita 
  • The futaoki is placed 5 weaves from the front edge of the mizusashi (usually 3 for hirademae) and 3 weaves from the tatami rim
  • The bottom tip of the hishaku handle lays 2 weaves from the front of the izumai
  • Izumai is straight
  • Hishaku sits straight on the kama


Daime, standard-orientation (Daime hon-gatte)

台目・本勝手

  • A daime room is also know as a ‘daimegiri’. Daime refers to the special shape and size of the temae mat. The top of the mat above the hearth is cut to the size of a daisu. This means that rather than the usual 90cm, the top half of the mat is cut down to around 43.5cm (1 shaku 4 sun), the size of an average daisu
  • The temae is the same as per standard temae with the exception of the placement of the equipage. As the daime tatami is smaller, the tatami version of a daisu, the placement of the equipage reflects this
  • Enter the chashitsu with the chawan and tea caddy, sit in the centre of the tatami and place the chawan and the tea caddy down so the tea caddy comes to 6cm (4 tatami wales) from the front of the mizusashi. Note the equipage are placed in the centre of the tatami, not in front of the mizusashi
  • The mizusashi is placed in the centre of A and B, in the middle of the right side (kyaku-tsuki) of the tatami. The diameter of the pillar (naka-bashira) is 6.6cm (2 sun)
  • Your seat is the same as for times you use tana. Your seat (izumai) faces the outside corner of the hearth frame (robuchi)
  • The futaoki is placed the same as for times you use tana. On the outside mat

 



Daime, reverse-orientation (Daime gyaku-gatte)

台目・逆勝手

  • Mizusashi is centred between the naka-bashira post and the wall 
  • Tea caddy and tea bowl are centred on the tatami, in the yin space either side of the centre yang line
  • Izumai is aligned with the outside corner of the hearth frame (robuchi)
  • The right-side (side of the uchi-ate-bashira) is shimo
  • Refer to the diagram for other kanewari details


Sumi-ro (corner-hearth), standard-orientation (hon-gatte)

角炉・本勝手

  • The position of the equipage for the corner hearth (sumi-ro) temae is very much the same as the standard teame for brazier
  • At the top of the tatami usually lies a wooden board called a ‘mukō-ita’. In between the mukō-ita and the hearth frame is a further small board called a ‘ko-ita’. During yobanashi night-time tea gatherings, the teshoku candle holder is placed on the mukō-ita
  • The mizusashi is placed in line with the kettle lugs (kan-tsuki-dōri) on the guest-side of the tatami (kyaku-tsuki). The izumai (formal sitting position for the temae) is angled slightly towards the bottom right corner of the hearth frame (ro-buchi)
  • There is one shaku distance between the edge of your lap and the hearth frame (30.3cm)
  • The hishaku rests on the kama in a straight line parallel with the tatami
  • (women) Place the fukusa back in your obi after opening the lid of the kama, not on the tatami
  • The mizusashi lid rests against the wall at shimo of the futaoki, not on the side of the mizusashi
  • After whisking tea, present to guests on the outside mat making sure the chawan is not lower (shimo) than the front edge of your lap
  • Tana (display stands) are not used in a koma (small room under 4.5 tatami)
  • Formal ‘shin’ equipage is not used in a koma (small room under 4.5 tatami). Examples of shin-grade equipage are shin te-oke water pail mizusashi, seiji (celedon porcelian), sometsuki ware, tenmoku tea chawan, etc

 



Sumi-ro (corner-hearth), reverse-orientation (gyaku-gatte)

角炉・逆勝手

  • At the top of the tatami usually lies a wooden board called a ‘mukō-ita’. In between the mukō-ita and the hearth frame is a further small board called a ‘ko-ita’. During yobanashi night-time tea gatherings, the teshoku candle holder is placed on the mukō-ita.
  • The mizusashi is placed in line with the kettle lugs (kan-tsuki-dōri) on the guest-side of the tatami (kyaku-tsuki). The izumai (formal sitting position for the temae) is angled slightly towards the bottom right corner of the hearth frame (ro-buchi).
  • There is one shaku distance between the edge of your lap and the hearth frame (30.3cm)
  • Izumai aligns with the front corner of the hearth
  • The hishaku rests on the kama in a straight line parallel with the tatami
  • Place the fukusa back in your obi after opening the lid of the kama, not on the tatami (women)
  • The mizusashi lid rests against the wall at shimo of the futaoki, not on the side of the mizusashi
  • After whisking tea, present to guests on the outside mat making sure the chawan is not lower (shimo) than the front edge of your lap
  • Tana (display stands) are not used in a koma (small room under 4.5 tatami)
  • Formal ‘shin’ equipage is not used in a koma (small room under 4.5 tatami). Examples of shin-grade equipage are shin te-oke water pail mizusashi, seiji (celedon porcelian), sometsuki ware, tenmoku tea chawan, etc


Mukō-giri (reverse-cut hearth), standard-orientation (Mukō-giri, hon-gatte)

向切・本勝手

  • The reverse-cut hearth configuration has the hearth cut into the top right corner of the temae tatami. At the top of the tatami usually lies a wooden board called a ‘mukō-ita’. In between the mukō-ita and the hearth frame is a further small board called a ‘ko-ita’. During yobanashi night-time tea gatherings, the teshoku candle holder is placed on the mukō-ita
  • At the top of the tatami usually lies a wooden board called a ‘mukō-ita’. In between the mukō-ita and the hearth frame is a further small board called a ‘ko-ita’. During yobanashi night-time tea gatherings, the teshoku candle holder is placed on the mukō-ita
  • The mizusashi is placed in line with the kettle lugs (kan-tsuki-dōri) on the mizuya side (katte) of the tatami
  • There is one shaku distance between the edge of your lap and the hearth frame (30.3cm). The izumai (formal sitting position for the temae) is angled slightly towards the bottom right corner of the hearth frame (ro-buchi)
  • The hishaku rests on the futaoki and kama in a straight line parallel with the tatami
  • If the tea caddy is a natsume, the natsume and chasen are placed in the ‘flowing hand’ (nagashi-de) placement. If the tea caddy is of higher rank, it is placed horizontal to the mizusashi and hearth
  • Place the fukusa back in your obi after opening the lid of the kama, not on the tatami
  • The mizusashi lid rests against the wall at shimo of the futaoki, not on the side of the mizusashi
  • After whisking tea, present to guests on the outside mat making sure the chawan is not lower (shimo) than the front edge of your lap
  • Tana (display stands) are not used in a koma (small room under 4.5 tatami)
  • Formal ‘shin’ equipage is not used in a koma (small room under 4.5 tatami). Examples of shin-grade equipage are shin te-oke water pail mizusashi, seiji (celedon porcelian), sometsuki ware, tenmoku tea chawan, etc.


Mukō-giri (reverse-cut hearth), reverse-orientation (Mukō-giri, gyaku-gatte)

向切・逆勝手

  • Mizusashi is centred in the right side of the tatami, in line with the kettle lugs (kantsuki-dōri)
  • Izumai is in line with the front corner of the hearth (angled slightly towards your guests)
  • There is one shaku (30.3cm) distance between the edge of your lap and the hearth frame. The izumai (formal sitting position for the temae) is angled slightly towards the bottom right corner of the hearth frame (ro-buchi)
  • The hishaku rests on the kama in a straight line parallel with the tatami
  • Place the fukusa back in your obi after opening the lid of the kama, not on the tatami
  • The mizusashi lid rests against the wall at shimo of the futaoki, not on the side of the mizusashi
  • After whisking tea, present to guests on the outside mat making sure the chawan is not lower (shimo) than the front edge of your lap
  • Tana (display stands) are not used in a koma (small room under 4.5 tatami)
  • Formal ‘shin’ equipage is not used in a koma (small room under 4.5 tatami). Examples of shin-grade equipage are shin te-oke water pail mizusashi, seiji (celedon porcelian), sometsuki ware, tenmoku tea chawan, etc.


Ryūrei table

立礼台

  • The ryurei table (ryureidai) is composed of a ‘tenchadai’ (top table including the left side table for the kensui), a ‘haikendai’ right side table for presenting tea equipage for viewing to guests, and a stool
  • The haikendai is placed around 20cm above the front edge of the tenchadai
  • The stool is positioned according to the host’s height
  • The iron kettle is placed on the ganro (round hearth), on point A
  • The mizusashi is placed in the middle of points 1 and 2, in line with the kettle lugs
  • The kensui is placed on the dedicated left shelf, called a 'kensuidai'
  • The futaoki (lid rest) is placed 4.5 cm to the side and back from from the corner of the imaginary square drawn around the ‘ganro’ round hearth, at position E

Creative Commons Licence 

Adam Sōmu Wojciński, 2018 

Subscribe to our newsletter

Search this website: